Wto Government Procurement Agreement Signatories

The GPA is a multi-lateral agreement within the WTO framework, which means that not all WTO members are parties to the agreement. Currently, the agreement consists of 20 parties, with 48 WTO members. Thirty-six WTO members/observers participate in the GPA committee as observers. Of these, 12 members are in the process of joining the agreement. The Public Procurement Agreement (GPA) is a multi-lateral agreement, under the auspices of the World Trade Organization (WTO), which governs the purchase of goods and services by the public authorities of the contracting parties, based on the principles of openness, transparency and non-discrimination. The signatories of the GPA agreed that companies from other signatory countries will not be treated less favourably in terms of public procurement than domestic firms, in accordance with the principles of national treatment and non-discrimination. Locally created businesses are no less well treated because they are of foreign origin or because the goods and services they offer are of foreign origin. The accession process begins with the submission of an application for membership and has two main aspects: negotiations between the member member and the parties to the GPA on the offer of coverage of the GPA and the verification of the compliance of the member`s contracting rules with the requirements of the GPA, for example in terms of transparency, procedural fairness for suppliers and national control. The WTO secretariat provides technical assistance to help WTO members from developing countries who wish to learn more about the GPA and/or GPA. If so, and desired by the candidate countries, other intergovernmental organizations (for example.

B regional development banks) or governance institutions may also provide technical assistance for GPA membership. When a supplier believes that this agreement is in violation, it is encouraged to consult with the purchasing entity to resolve the issue. If such consultations do not result satisfactory, each undersigned government should provide that it imposes timely, transparent and effective non-discriminatory procedures that would allow suppliers to challenge alleged breaches of the agreement. Suppliers may be required to initiate an appeal procedure within a specified period of time (no less than ten days) from the date the basis of the complaint was known. Disputes must be heard by an impartial independent tribunal or audit body that is not interested in the outcome of the award of the contract. Dispute proceedings must be completed «in due course.» Yes, yes. If you are having difficulty selling goods or services to purchase entities from a government undersigned because that government has not complied with that agreement, contact the U.S. Department of Commerce Trade Agreements Negotiations and Compliance tender line. The Center can help you understand your rights under this agreement, and can notify relevant U.S. government officials to help you resolve your issue.

The U.S. government may, if necessary, raise the specific facts of your situation with the government of the other country concerned and ask the officials of that government to reconsider the matter.